Tag Archives: Arguments Against Seat Belts

Facts About Seat Belts All Truck Drivers Should Know

One important fact about seat belts everyone should know is that wearing seat belts can help save lives. It is 2018, and you would be surprised by the number of people that simply do not wear their seat belts. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2016:

  • 90.1% of the U.S. population wears seat belts.
  • Seat belts saved 14,668 lives during vehicle accidents.
  • 2,456 additional lives could have been saved if everyone had used their seat belts.
  • There were approximately 27.5 million people who did not wear seat belts.1

Clicking on seat belt

 

Out of the serious accidents in 2016, based on data provided by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control):

  • There was a total of 23,714 deaths of drivers and passengers.
  • Between 53% and 62% of teens aged 13 to 19 and adults ages 20 to 44 accounted for the largest part of these deaths and were not wearing their seat belts at the time of the vehicle crashes.2

Myths About Seat Belts All Truck Drivers Need to Know

Some of the more common myths people hold about seat belt usage include:

 

  1. My vehicle has airbags so I don’t need to wear my seat belt. Airbags are designed to work with seat belts and not alone.
  2. You can be trapped in a fire or under water if you wear your seat belt. These types of accidents are very rare. If you don’t wear your seat belt, you could be knocked unconscious and wouldn’t be able to escape.
  3. If you are only driving a short distance, you don’t need to wear your seat belt. Most fatal and serious accidents occur within 25 miles of home and at speeds of less than 40 mph.
  4. You are safer in a truck, so wearing a seat belt is not necessary. Wearing a seat belt can reduce the risks of fatal injuries by 60%.1

As evidenced, wearing a seat belt can help save your life and the life of others should you get into an accident.

 

Man driving a truck

 

For new truck seats with seat belts, replacement seat belts, and other safety equipment for your truck, please feel free to contact Suburban Seating & Safety at 1-844-SAS-SEAT today!

Sources:

  1. https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/seat-belts
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/seatbelts/facts.html

Adding Seat Belts to Buses Could Save Lives

 

Seat belts have saved countless lives since becoming standard equipment for passenger automobiles in the mid-20th century. Private and public buses, including school buses, have yet to make seat belts standard, although many buses have them.

 

Seat Belts to Buses

Research shows that installing seat belts in bus seats can reduce serious injuries and fatalities. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics has been recommending that school buses require three-point seat belts at all times. The National Safety Council agrees, but believes such guidelines should apply to all buses—including public transportation systems.

 

However, some Americans still have questions. If you’ve been wondering why should school buses have seat belts, you might find the information in this post enlightening.

The Current Situation

School buses, municipal buses, and other buses are already designed to minimize harm in the event of an accident. The spacing and cushioning of seats on buses are designed to keep occupants from being flung around in an accident and to absorb force. This approach effectively increases passenger safety in an accident compared to a car, truck, or van.

 

Buses are very safe—in fact, most injuries and fatalities in crashes involving buses occur in the other vehicles involved in these crashes. It is exceptionally rare for parties on a bus to experience serious injury or death in the same accidents, mostly because buses are larger and heavier and have a more solid frame.

 

Nevertheless, installing seat belts in buses could help further reduce fatalities and injuries among bus occupants involved in crashes.

About Bus Accidents

A significant minority of bus crashes involve rollovers or ejections from the vehicle. This is the strongest argument for seat belts on buses. Padded seats and smart spacing alone cannot protect against the type of injuries someone may experience if they are thrown against the ceiling, or worse yet, out of a window or door. At that point, the risk comes from the impact itself.

 

Seat belts can help prevent or mitigate injuries in accidents where buses roll over because they keep the passenger in the seat, rather than allowing them to eject. They can also prevent passengers from being thrown hard against the ceiling or floor, which reduces the risk of head injuries and broken bones.

Arguments Against Seat Belts on School Buses

Despite the evidence for seat belts being a wise choice in buses, there are some arguments against seat belts on school buses. These primarily relate to how much such an endeavor would cost and whether or not the risk is high enough to justify the change in the first place.

 

Retrofitting buses with seat belts and installing them on new buses does carry some additional cost. A University of Alabama study says that installing seat belts on school buses would add about $8,000 to $15,000 to the cost of a bus. Adding seat belts to public transit and private charter buses would likely have similar costs.

 

Bus travel is already widely acknowledged as the safest form of land transportation, and some believe this may be enough of an argument against seat belts on school buses all on its own. A study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that examined motor coach fatalities between 1996 and 2005 found that, on average, there were only about 14 fatalities in bus accidents each year.

 

Others believe that 14 fatalities are 14 too many—and they’re right. Adding seat belts to the mix could make bus travel even safer, bringing the loss of life in motorcoach accidents closer to zero.

Legal Debates and Legislation

Just because legislation to make seat belts necessary on buses doesn’t exist now, it doesn’t mean it won’t exist in the future. In fact, in early May of this year, Congress debated this exact topic. So far, there is immense bipartisan support for at least a regulation making three-point seat belts mandatory on school buses. The bill hasn’t yet passed, and it isn’t clear whether it might apply to transportation buses, too, or just school buses.

 

Suburban Seating & Safety provides truck seating, bus seating, and related products to transportation clients. You can outfit your commercial or education sector bus for safety and comfort with our help. Choose from a wide variety of products, including custom truck seats, truck accessories, bus gear, and specialized seat belts, and ensure the lives you are entrusted with each day are always protected and safe.

 

custom truck seats belt

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